Infrastructure 2013: global priorities, global insights

  • Share

In a world suffering unprecedented economic and environmental challenges, the importance of infrastructure is being recognized by populations and politicians alike.

The long-term issue of funding (who pays?) and the shorter-term options for financing of infrastructure (how do we pay?) are becoming hugely important questions for policy makers and the government officials responsible for creating and maintaining the assets that enable 21st-century cities to function.

Spending on infrastructure offers fiscal stimulus for economies, employment and improved quality of life for communities.

Global Infrastructure Demand Requires $57 Trillion in Investment by 2030
Based on projections of demand equaling 3.5 percent of global GDP, 2013–2030

Source: McKinsey Global Institute, Infrastructure Productivity: How to Save $1 Trillion a Year, January 2013.

Our seventh annual report, produced with the Urban Land Institute, examines key trends and issues in the major global markets of the Asia Pacific region, Europe/Middle East/Africa and the Americas.

Infrastructure 2013 has drawn upon a broad range of discussions with public and private sector procurers, funders, operators and advisers to report on the critical factors affecting infrastructure in emerging and developed economies.

 

Howard Roth
Howard Roth
Global Real Estate Leader
EY
Patrick Philips
Patrick Philips
Chief Executive Officer
Urban Land Institute


Global Infrastructure Demand Requires $57 Trillion in Investment by 2030

Based on projections of demand equaling 3.5 percent of global GDP, 2013–2030

×

Source: McKinsey Global Institute, Infrastructure Productivity: How to Save $1 Trillion a Year, January 2013.