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Pursuing excellence in patient care - EY - United States

New Horizons: 2011 health care provider report

Pursuing excellence in patient care

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Projected cost variances for selected over-running capital infrastructure projects

Projected cost variances for selected over-running capital infrastructure projects

Note: Percentage variances between market-advised cost projections and original estimates for selected capital infrastructure projects

Source: Publicly available material and EY analysis



Do you set expectations for the patient experience, and then measure how you’ve met or exceeded these expectations?

The central treatment philosophy of the post-reform world is to prevent illness and unnecessary hospitalizations, and to improve community health status.

As the health care industry continues to focus on quality and safety, payers such as CMS and organizations such as The Joint Commission have begun to put more emphasis on patient-centered approaches in their assessments of health care providers. More than ever before, providers will need to focus on ensuring that all patients receive the right care, at the right time, in the right way — and that patients are empowered to expand their role in self-care and decision-making.

Achieving customer service with patients

Kristin Baird, RN, BSN, MHA, author of Raising the Bar on Service Excellence: The Health Care Leader’s Guide to Putting Passion into Practice believes hospitals and other patient care organizations need to increase their customer service.

“Excellence in health care customer service fuses the essence of nursing with the logic of marketing and business development,” she says.

Baird started her health care career as a nurse and transitioned to hospital administration. She thinks one way organizations can pursue excellence in patient care is to focus on their customer service.

“Leaders in health care customer service understand that developing a consistently positive customer experience doesn’t happen by chance. It happens by design,” she says.

Considerations for your board and executive leaders

Patient satisfaction: How do you obtain information about patients’ care preferences and needs?

Measurement: Do you set expectations for the patient experience, and then measure how you’ve met or exceeded these expectations?

Technology: How does your technology support a patient-centered approach — for example, patient flow technologies that better manage patient throughput and clinical systems that enhance clinician communication and responsiveness?

Leadership: Have your board, executives, department heads and clinicians made a clear commitment to patient-centered care?



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