3 minute read 1 Nov 2019
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Are Gen Z really more prepared for the technologically-transformed working world of tomorrow?

By

EY Oceania

Multidisciplinary professional services organization

3 minute read 1 Nov 2019
Related topics Digital AI

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Generation Z is starting to enter the workplace and while Australia’s current business leaders and our teenage population grew up in vastly different digital environments, the one thing that they have in common is that to survive and thrive in today’s technologically-transformed working world, they will need to ask better questions.

During our series of interviews with CEOs and their teenage children, both generations agreed that whatever technological advances present themselves in the future, a skill that will always be paramount and survive the test of time is an inquisitive mind. Knowing what to ask, when to ask and what to do with the information will set us apart from machine learning and AI advances. It’s that ‘human angle’ that will always prevail to some extent and be required to help steer the technology to provide the greatest impact.

But beyond the importance of an inquisitive mind, it’s the soft skills like problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, teamwork, communication that will continue to exist and become increasingly important in the future. As Matt Tindale, General Manager, LinkedIn Australia and New Zealand, puts it: “For jobs that don’t exist yet, it’s all about the soft skills.” 

The conversation between Robi Stanton, General Manager, WarnerMedia Entertainment Networks ANZ and daughters Harper and Coco, reinforces this point as Gen Z considers its skillset. As Robi’s daughter, Harper, says: communication is the most important skill we need to learn right now. “You’re not going to have a job, ever, where you don’t need to talk to people.”

In his conversation with son Charlie, Matt Tindale also goes on to comment on human connections: “technology, through the removal of mundane tasks, will free up a lot of people to be able to do more creative, intuitive, consultative work and actually spend more time with people.”

Harper goes on to comment: “We’re pushed to create and problem solve so we can be an innovative generation”, to mum Robi’s observation that the increase in technology has forced her industry to “evolve and bring new talent in as they’ve needed new skills”. But Robi’s view is that ultimately, the attitude of being open to lifelong learning is what’s really going to win out here and being “committed to constantly updating your skillset” to suit a changing environment.

CEOs talk with their teenagers

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Summary

Australia’s current business leaders and our teenage population grew up in vastly different digital environments, the one thing that they have in common is that to survive and thrive in today’s technologically-transformed working world, they need to ask better questions.

About this article

By

EY Oceania

Multidisciplinary professional services organization

Related topics Digital AI