4 minute read 16 Dec 2019
EY - Woman working from home

Is your biggest tax obligation the one you can’t see?

By

Albert Anelli

EY Canada Managing Partner, Tax

Committed to leading a team of more than 1,300 tax professionals delivering quality and innovation to our clients. Avid cyclist and traveller. Father.

4 minute read 16 Dec 2019

Explore Managing Your Personal Taxes: a Canadian Perspective for helpful tax-saving ideas

Personal tax affects us all in some way. Regardless of your stage in life — from starting your career to retirement and estate planning — you face a number of complex and sometimes confusing questions. And whether you’re investing for the future, looking to buy your first home, selling a business, dealing with medical expenses or emigrating from Canada, your tax profile will be impacted.

Fortunately, there are lots of tax-saving opportunities available to Canadians. In Managing Your Personal Taxes: a Canadian Perspective, we share a wide range of ideas to help you plan ahead, manage in the moment or deal with unexpected circumstances.

In this helpful guide you’ll find the following topics:

  • Selling your business: Selling a business can be a complex and emotional process. Learn about the tax and business considerations to help make the sale a success.
  • Investors: When you’re making investment decisions, think about the after-tax real rate of return of investment alternatives in relation to their associated risk. From interest and dividend income to capital gains and losses, charitable donations to RRSPs, TFSAs and more, find out how you can benefit from proper planning.
  • Professionals and business owners: There are many valuable tax-planning opportunities available. Whether you’re considering the use of a personal vehicle or the deductibility of travel expenses, incorporation, use of a partnership or other issues that affect professionals and business owners, learn how you can keep more of your hard-earned money.
  • Employees: From benefits such as company cars, to stock options and sales tax rebates, employees of Canadian companies can take advantage of some helpful tax-saving opportunities.
  • Principal residences: The principal residence exemption is an attractive feature of the Canadian tax system. Find out how you may be able to earn the capital gain you realize on the sale of a principal residence in a way that is free from tax.
  • Families: There’s virtually no area of family life in Canada that’s not affected in some way by tax. But there are many tax credits and planning strategies you should be aware of that could help you and your family find significant savings.
  • Tax assistance for long-term elder care: Populations across the industrialized world are aging more rapidly than ever. In recent years, the proportion of persons aged 65 years and older has grown in every G7 country. Learn about tax credits available for individuals, tax relief for assisted care and medical expenditures.
  • Retirement planning: Whether you’re just starting your career or have years of service under your belt, you need to plan for retirement. And tax planning should be at the center of your retirement strategy.
  • Estate planning: While we may not like to think about the inevitable, an effective estate plan can minimize tax on and after your death and provide benefits to your surviving family members over the long term.
  • US citizenship: US citizenship and nationality law can be complex, so it’s not surprising that many people have no knowledge of their US citizen status. Such people are often referred to as “accidental Americans” because an individual can obtain US citizenship “accidentally” by birth in the US, through birth abroad to a US-citizen parent or as the result of a parent’s naturalization. If you may find yourself in this position, it’s vital to know the potential tax consequences.
  • US tax for Canadians: If you’re a Canadian (but not a US citizen) who spends significant time in the US for either work or leisure, you may be required to file US federal income tax returns. Learn how you can make effective tax planning a part of your cross-border life.
  • Emigration and immigration: If you immigrate to Canada, you’ll likely be treated as a Canadian resident for the period you’re resident in the country, and as a nonresident if you emigrate from Canada for the period you’re a nonresident of Canada, but the concept of residency is elusive. Both situations carry tax consequences, so you need to be aware of the rules. If you’re thinking of moving to or from Canada, consider this chapter.
  • Canadian tax for nonresidents: If you’re not a Canadian resident but you receive Canadian-source income, it may be subject to Canadian income tax. Find out how planning strategies can help you save on that tax.
  • Tax payments and refunds: Once you’ve put your tax plan into place and have prepared your returns, we offer helpful guidance on making the last part of the process as efficient as possible.

Summary

You’ll find all this and much more — including links to other EY guides, our helpful tax calculators and rates, and details on changes to income-splitting rules — in Managing Your Personal Taxes: a Canadian Perspective.

About this article

By

Albert Anelli

EY Canada Managing Partner, Tax

Committed to leading a team of more than 1,300 tax professionals delivering quality and innovation to our clients. Avid cyclist and traveller. Father.