EY and the Arts

At EY, we believe that the arts has a significant role to play in the prosperity of the UK.

We support the arts because we can see the integral role the sector has on the societal and economic wellbeing of the UK. The arts also provides an important sense of connection and outlet for our emotions.

We have been supporting the sector since 1994 and in 2013 we launched The EY Tate Arts Partnership which extends across all four Tate galleries. Beyond our partnership with Tate, we work with a number of leading institutions around the UK. This ensures the benefit of our programme is felt around the country for our people, our clients and the communities we work within.

Most recent exhibitions

Rodin sculpture

Image credit: Auguste Rodin Etude pour Iris c.1891–93 Musée Rodin, S. 00851

The EY Exhibition:
The Making of Rodin

Tate Modern, 17 May-21 November 2021

EY are delighted to sponsor Tate’s re-opening show at Tate Modern, ‘The EY Exhibition: The Making of Rodin’ after a long year of closure. This ground-breaking new exhibition will offer a unique insight into Rodin’s innovative ways of working, featuring over 200 works, many of which have never been shown outside France before. It will bring to life his transformative studio practices which paved the way for modern sculpture as we know it today. Rodin was as an innovator and disruptor, and his ability to reimagine traditional processes is inspiration for all and led EY to support this exhibition. 

The EY Exhibition:
Van Gogh and Britain

Tate Britain, 27 March-11 August 2019

This exhibition took a new look at the artist through his relationship with Britain. Van Gogh was inspired by British art, literature and culture, and he in turn inspired British artists and played a central role in paving the way for modern British art.

EY launched our wellbeing programme alongside this exhibition, calling on Van Gogh’s struggles with mental health as a catalyst to have open conversations. This work has continued, offering a range of wellbeing initiatives to our staff, clients and across the communities we work within.

Van Gogh

Image credit: Vincent Van Gogh Farms near Auvers 1890 Tate Bequeathed by C. Frank Stoop 1933 ©Tate

EY Woman Looking at a Painting by Picasso

Pablo Picasso The Three Dancers 1925 Tate Purchased with a special Grant-in-Aid and the Florence Fox Bequest with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery and the Contemporary Art Society 1965 © Succession Picasso/DACS 2021

The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy

Tate Modern, 8 March–9 September 2018

Tate Modern staged its first ever solo exhibition of Picasso’s work from the year 1932, one of the most prolific years in the artist’s life. Showcasing more than 100 of Picasso’s paintings, sculptures and paper-based works, this exhibition took visitors on a linear journey through Picasso’s ‘year of wonders’ to reveal the artist’s intricacy and richness. Even by his own standards, 1932 was an astonishing year for Picasso and his celebrity status became established as one of the most ground-breaking artists of the 20th century.

Previous exhibitions

  • The EY Exhibition: Impressionists in London

    EY Painting by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

    Image credit: James Abbott McNeill Whistler Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea 1871 Tate Bequeathed by Miss Rachel and Miss Jean Alexander 1972 © Tate

    Tate Britain, 2 November 2017 - 7 May 2018

    Bringing together over 100 spectacular works by Monet, Tissot, Pissarro and others, this extraordinary exhibition mapped the stories of the French artists who fled to Britain during the Franco-Prussian War. Inspired by the British way of life, this show explored the aesthetic impact London had on these artists, whose work offered a captivating new perspective of the city.

    Bringing the show into the 21st century – it was also a comment on the importance of cultural collaboration and understanding. A topic never more relevant than today.

  • The EY Exhibition: Wifredo Lam

    Tate Modern, September 2016

    In this exhibition, Tate Modern presented the first London museum retrospective of the Cuban modernist painter, Wifredo Lam, since 1952. Tracing Lam’s six-decade career from the 1920s to the 1970s, the exhibition brought together over 200 paintings, drawings, photographs and prints. As an artist of Chinese, Spanish, African and Latin American descent, Lam’s cross-cultural heritage influenced him to combine traditional practices with surrealist ideas throughout his work.

    Wifredo Lam

    Image credit: Wifredo Lam Untitled 1943 Private collection, courtesy of Mary-Anne Martin Fine Art, New York © SDO Estate of Wifredo Lam © Tate

  • The EY Exhibition: The World Goes Pop

    EY Exhibition The World Goes Pop

    Image credit: Nicola L. Red Coat 1969 © Nicola L. Collection and Archive

    Tate Modern, 17 September 2015 – 24 January 2016

    This unique exhibition explored how artists around the world engaged with the spirit of Pop, from Latin America to Asia, and from Europe to the Middle East. The show brought together over 160 works from the 1960s and 1970s to be showcased at Tate Modern, many of which had never been shown in the UK before. The exhibition examined the traditional story of Pop and revealed how different cultures contributed to the movement.

  • The EY Exhibition: Sonia Delaunay

    Tate Modern, 15 April – 9 August 2015

    Tate Modern presented the first UK retrospective of the French artist Sonia Delaunay, showcasing her importance throughout the twentieth century as a central figure in the Parisian avant-garde. Delaunay’s vibrant, colourful work spanned the mediums of painting, fashion and design. The show celebrated the breadth of her work throughout her vibrant artistic career, from figurative painting in the 1900s to her abstract work in the 1960s.

    EY Sonia Delaunay Exhibition

    Image credit: Sonia Delaunay Electric Prisms 1914 Centre Pompidou, Paris. Musée national d'art moderne/Centre de création industrielle. Purchased by the State, 1958 © Tate

  • The EY Exhibition: Late Turner – Painting Set Free

    EY Exhibition Tate Partnership Turner

    Image credit: J.M.W. Turner Ancient Rome; Agrippina Landing with the Ashes of Germanicus exhibited 1839 Tate Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856 © Tate

    Tate Modern, 17 September 2015 – 24 January 2016

    This unique exhibition explored how artists around the world engaged with the spirit of Pop, from Latin America to Asia, and from Europe to the Middle East. The show brought together over 160 works from the 1960s and 1970s to be showcased at Tate Modern, many of which had never been shown in the UK before. The exhibition examined the traditional story of Pop and revealed how different cultures contributed to the movement.

  • The EY Exhibition – Paul Klee: Making Visible

    Tate Modern, 16 October 2013 – 9 March 2014

    Tate Modern brought together over 130 drawings, watercolours and paintings from collections around the world for ‘The EY Exhibition – Paul Klee: Making Visible’. One of the most prominent artists to work at the Bauhaus, Klee was a central figure in European Modernism. Spanning across three decades of Klee’s career, this exhibition brought to light the artist’s emergence in Munich in the 1920s, his years of teaching at the Bauhaus, and his last paintings produced in Bern at the start of the second World War. 

    EY Paul Klee Painting

    Image credit: Paul Klee Harmony of the Norther Flora 1927 Zentrum Paul Klee, Bern, Livia Klee Donation © Tate